Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Attacks (PNEA)

 

Background

 

If you've been around the Emergency Department for a while, then you're likely to have seen your fair share of pseudoseizures. This infamous condition can be frustrating for a busy ED doc (this post from GomerBlog captures the feeling for many). Additionally, it can be challenging at times to tell a pseudoseizure from an epileptic seizure. All in all, they are a bit of a strange entity - Neurological? Psychological?... Faking?

 

Most of us have much to learn about pseudoseizures. Even the name is wrong: what used to be called pseudoseizures was re-defined as PNES (psychogenic non-epileptic seizures) at the turn of the century, and even this has now changed to PNEA (psychogenic non-epileptic attacks).

 

I offer the following two papers to help us understand PNEA. The first is a recent opinion piece, co-authored by a neurologist and a psychiatrist. The second is a systematic review and meta-analysis looking at which clinical signs can distinguish PNEA from epileptic seizures.

 

Paper 1 - overview of PNEA

 

Tolchin B, Martino S, Hirsch LJ. Treatment of patients with psychogenic nonepileptic attacks. JAMA. 2019 Apr;321(20):1967-1968​[1]​

 

 

Paper 2 - how can you be sure it's PNEA?

 

Avbersek A, Sisodiya S. Does the primary literature provide support for clinical signs used to distinguish psychogenic nonepileptic seizures from epileptic seizures? J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2010;81:719-725​[5]​

 

 

For detailed show notes please visit our website: https://the-breach.com

 

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